The Buddy System in Spearfishing Provides Safety and Backup

Spearfishing is one of the oldest methods of catching fish, going back as far as 16,000 years ago. The development of spearguns and underwater scuba diving have made it a popular activity for those who love adventure sports, the ocean, and fishing. As the sport has developed, there are three different variants: shore diving, boat diving and blue water or deep sea spearfishing. For all three kinds of diving, one basic safety rule is to never dive alone. The buddy system works best when everyone follows the rules of etiquette.

An ancient and popular sport
Spearfishing is a popular sport nowadays but it has its origins in ancient human cultures. Archeologists have found evidence, in the form of rock art, of people using spears to hunt fish in shallow water 16,000 years ago. The development of equipment like scuba diving and spearguns has made it a popular underwater adventure sport. Spearfishing can be done in shallow water from the shore, or from boats, kayaks, and even oil rigs.
In some parts of the world, blue water spearfishing enthusiasts use boats for deep sea spearfishing. Many divers prefer to dive without scuba or snorkeling equipment. Some of them can reach depths of 130 to 200 feet, which involves holding their breath for up to four minutes. Most beginners get proper training through classes.

The buddy system for safety and backup
Whatever the form of diving, there are some basic rules of safety and etiquette that are followed. The buddy system is one of the most important and basic rules for safety while diving. It helps to keep divers safe and ensures that they have backup if it becomes necessary. It is important to follow the rules of underwater safety.
These can be as simple as sharing expenses for fuel and gear, and the hard work like cleaning the boat, as well as the fun stuff. It’s also important to share opportunities to shoot when in the water. In fact, it can be dangerous to shoot anything on your buddy’s side instead of letting them get a shot. Reciprocal courtesy like not kicking up silt or sand can make each dive safer and more enjoyable. It also gives you and your buddy a clear shot at the fish.

Spearfishing history goes back thousands of years to the earliest examples of rock art. It is now a popular underwater sport with those who enjoy underwater sports and adventures. The sport follows the buddy system as well as rules of underwater etiquette and safety.




There are no comments

Add yours